ꯒ꯭ꯔꯤꯛꯀꯤ ꯃꯤ ꯂꯥꯢ ꯇꯤꯟꯒꯤ ꯋꯥꯔꯤꯗ ꯌꯥꯎꯕ ꯁꯛꯂꯣꯟꯁꯤꯡ

ꯒ꯭ꯔꯤꯛ ꯈꯣꯌꯨꯝ ꯂꯥꯏꯒꯤ ꯁꯛꯂꯣꯟꯁꯤꯡ

ꯒ꯭ꯔꯤꯛꯀꯤ ꯃꯤ ꯂꯥꯢ ꯇꯤꯟꯒꯤ ꯋꯥꯔꯤꯗ ꯌꯥꯎꯕ ꯂꯥꯢ, ꯃꯤ, ꯇꯤꯟꯃꯨ ꯂꯥꯢꯃꯨ ꯅꯆꯤꯡꯕ ꯀꯌꯥꯃꯔꯨꯝꯒꯤ ꯃꯃꯤꯡ ꯄꯔꯤꯡꯁꯤꯡ ꯃꯈꯥꯗ ꯄꯤꯔꯤ ꯫

Raffaello, concilio degli dei 02.jpg

ꯁꯤꯕ ꯅꯥꯢꯗꯕꯁꯦꯝꯒꯠ ꯁꯥꯒꯠꯂꯨ

ꯑꯣꯂꯤꯝꯄꯤꯌꯥꯟ ꯱꯲ꯁꯦꯝꯒꯠ ꯁꯥꯒꯠꯂꯨ

ꯑꯣꯂꯤꯝꯄꯤꯌꯥꯟ ꯱꯲ꯗ ꯌꯦꯡꯕꯤꯌꯨ ꯑꯀꯨꯞꯄ ꯋꯥꯂꯣꯜꯀꯤꯇꯃꯛꯇ꯫

ꯑꯔꯤꯕ ꯃꯩꯍꯧꯂꯣꯜꯗꯒꯤ ꯂꯩꯔꯛꯂꯕ ꯂꯥꯢꯌꯥꯝꯁꯤꯡꯁꯦꯝꯒꯠ ꯁꯥꯒꯠꯂꯨ

 
Pontus in an ancient Roman mosaic from Tunisia
 
Eos (dawn) and the hero Memnon (490–480 BCE)
 
Helios in his four-horse chariot (3rd century BCE)
 
Themis, from the Temple of Nemesis (ꯇꯦꯝꯄ꯭ꯂꯦꯠ:C. 300 BCE)
 
Athena watches Prometheus create humans (3rd century CE)
Ancient Greek name English name Description
Αἰθήρ (Aithḗr) ꯑꯦꯏꯊꯔ The god of the upper air and light.
Ἀνάγκη (Anánkē) ꯑꯅꯥꯟꯀꯤ The goddess of inevitability, compulsion and need.
Χάος (Cháos) ꯀꯥꯎꯁ The nothingness from which everything else came. Described as a void.[꯱]
Χρόνος (Chrónos) ꯈ꯭ꯔꯣꯅꯣꯁ The titan of time. Not to be confused with the Titan Cronus, the father of Zeus.
Ἔρεβος (Érebos) ꯏꯔꯦꯕꯣꯁ The god of darkness and shadow.
Ἔρως (Eros) ꯏꯔꯣꯁ The god of love. The Roman version of Eros was Cupid.
Γαῖα (Gaîa) ꯒꯦꯌꯥ Goddess of the Earth (Mother Earth); mother of the Titans.
Ἡμέρα (Hēméra) ꯍꯦꯃꯦꯔꯥ Goddess of daylight.
Ὕπνος ("Hypnos") ꯍꯤꯞꯅꯣꯁ God of sleep.
Nῆσοι (Nē̂soi) The ꯅꯦꯁꯣꯢ The goddesses of islands and the sea.
Νύξ (Nýx) ꯅꯤꯛ꯭ꯁ The goddess of the night.
Οὐρανός (Ouranós) ꯌꯨꯔꯥꯅꯁ The god of the heavens (Father Sky); father of the Titans.
Οὔρεα (Oúrea) The ꯑꯧꯔꯤꯌꯥ The gods of mountains.
Φάνης (Phánēs) ꯐꯥꯅꯦꯁ The god of procreation.
Πόντος (Póntos) ꯄꯣꯟꯇꯁ The god of the sea, father of the fish and other sea creatures.
Τάρταρος (Tártaros) ꯇꯥꯔꯇꯥꯔꯁ God of the deepest, darkest part of the underworld (which is itself also referred to as Tartarus).
Θάλασσα (Thálassa) ꯊꯥꯂꯥꯁꯁꯥ Spirit of the sea and consort of Pontos.
Θάνατος ("Thánatos") ꯊꯥꯅꯥꯇꯣꯁ God of death. Brother to Hypnos (sleep) and in some myths Moros (doom).

ꯇꯥꯢꯇꯟꯁꯤꯡꯁꯦꯝꯒꯠ ꯁꯥꯒꯠꯂꯨ

ꯇꯥꯢꯇꯟꯁꯤꯡꯒꯤꯗꯃꯛ ꯌꯦꯡꯕꯤꯌꯨ ꯇꯥꯢꯇꯟꯁꯤꯡꯒꯤ ꯃꯃꯤꯡ ꯄꯔꯤꯡ

ꯁꯤꯕ ꯅꯥꯢꯕꯁꯦꯝꯒꯠ ꯁꯥꯒꯠꯂꯨ

Heroesꯁꯦꯝꯒꯠ ꯁꯥꯒꯠꯂꯨ

  • Abderus, helped Heracles during his eighth Labour. He was killed by the Mares of Diomedes.
  • Achilles (Αχιλλεύς or Αχιλλέας), hero of the Trojan War and a main character in the Iliad
  • Aeneas (Αινείας), a hero of the Trojan War and the common ancestor of the Roman people
  • Ajax the Great (Αίας ο Μέγας), a hero of the Trojan War and king of Salamis
  • Ajax the Lesser (Αίας ο Μικρός), a hero of the Trojan War and leader of the Locrian army
  • Amphitryon (Αμφιτρύων), Theban general who rescued Thebes from the Teumessian fox. His wife was Alcmene, mother of Heracles.
  • Bellerophon, hero who killed the Chimera
  • Castor, the mortal Dioscuri twin. After Castor died, his immortal brother Pollux shared his divinity with him so that they could still be together.
  • Chrysippus, a divine hero of Elis
  • Daedalus, creator of the labyrinth and great inventor, until King Minos trapped him in his own creation.
  • Diomedes, a king of Argos and hero of the Trojan War
  • Eleusis, hero of the town of Eleusis
  • Eunostus, a Boeotian hero
  • Ganymede, hero of Troy and lover of Zeus. He was given immortality and made cup-bearer to the gods.
  • Hector, hero of the Trojan War and champion of the Trojans
  • Iolaus, nephew of Heracles who helped his uncle in one of his Labours
  • Jason, leader of the Argonauts
  • Meleager, a hero who sailed with the Argonauts and killed the Calydonian Boar
  • Odysseus, a hero and king of Ithaca. His travels are the subject of Homer's Odyssey. He also played an important role in the Trojan War.
  • Orpheus, a legendary musician and poet who tried to recover his dead wife from the underworld
  • Pandion, the hero of the Pandionis tribe of Attica. He is usually assumed to be one of the legendary Athenian kings Pandion I or Pandion II.
  • Perseus (Περσεύς), the first king of Mycenae and son of Zeus. He killed Medusa.
  • Theseus, son of Poseidon and a king of Athens. He killed the Minotaur.

Notable womenꯁꯦꯝꯒꯠ ꯁꯥꯒꯠꯂꯨ

  • Alcestis (Άλκηστις), daughter of Pelias and wife of Admetus. She was known for being very devoted to her husband.
  • Amymone, the only one of Danaus' daughters who refused to murder her husband
  • Andromache (Ανδρομάχη), wife of Hector
  • Andromeda (Ανδρομέδα), wife of Perseus. She was placed among the stars after her death.
  • Antigone (Αντιγόνη), daughter of Oedipus and Jocasta
  • Arachne (Αράχνη), a skilled weaver who was transformed into a spider by Athena
  • Ariadne (Αριάδνη), daughter of King Minos of Crete. She helped Theseus to kill the Minotaur and became the wife of Dionysus.
  • Atalanta (Αταλάντη), heroine who participated in the Calydonian Boar hunt
  • Briseis, a princess of Lyrnessus, taken by Achilles as a prize of war
  • Caeneus, formerly Caenis, a woman who was transformed into a man and became a warrior.
  • Cassandra, a princess of Troy who was cursed. She could see the future but nobody would ever believe her.
  • Clytemnestra, sister of Helen and wife of Agamemnon
  • Danaë, the mother of Perseus by Zeus
  • Deianeira, the second wife of Heracles. She was tricked into killing her husband.
  • Electra, daughter of Agamemnon and Clytemnestra. She helped her brother Orestes plan revenge against their mother for the murder of their father.
  • Europa, a Phoenician woman, kidnapped by Zeus
  • Hecuba (Ἑκάβη), wife of Priam, king of Troy, with whom she had 19 children
  • Helen, daughter of Zeus and Leda. Her abduction caused the Trojan War.
  • Hermione (Ἑρμιόνη), daughter of Menelaus and Helen. She was the wife of Neoptolemus, and later Orestes.
  • Iphigenia, daughter of Agamemnon and Clytemnestra. Agamemnon sacrificed her to Artemis to make the goddess happy.
  • Ismene, sister of Antigone
  • Jocasta, mother and wife of Oedipus
  • Medea, a sorceress and wife of Jason. She killed her own children to punish Jason for being unfaithful.
  • Medusa, a mortal woman transformed into a monster by Athena
  • Niobe, a daughter of Tantalus. She claimed to be superior to Leto, which caused Artemis and Apollo to kill her 14 children.
  • Pandora, the first woman
  • Penelope, loyal wife of Odysseus
  • Phaedra, daughter of Minos and wife of Theseus
  • Polyxena, the youngest daughter of Priam. She was sacrificed to the ghost of Achilles.
  • Semele, mortal mother of Dionysus

Kingsꯁꯦꯝꯒꯠ ꯁꯥꯒꯠꯂꯨ

  • Abas, a king of Argos
  • Acastus, a king of Iolcus. He sailed with the Argonauts and participated in the Calydonian Boar hunt.
  • Acrisius, a king of Argos
  • Actaeus, first king of Attica
  • Admetus (Άδμητος), a king of Pherae. He sailed with the Argonauts and participated in the Calydonian Boar hunt.
  • Adrastus (Άδραστος), a king of Argos and one of the Seven Against Thebes
  • Aeacus (Αιακός), a king of the island of Aegina. After he died, he became one of the three judges of the dead in the underworld.
  • Aeëtes, a king of Colchis and father of Medea
  • Aegeus (Αιγεύς), a king of Athens and father of Theseus
  • Aegimius, a king of Thessaly and the common ancestor of the Dorians
  • Aegisthus (Αίγισθος), lover of Clytemnestra. Together they planned to murder Agamemnon and become king and queen of Mycenae.
  • Aegyptus (Αίγυπτος), a king of Egypt
  • Aeson, father of Jason and rightful king of Iolcus. His throne was taken from him by his half-brother Pelias.
  • Aëthlius, first king of Elis
  • Aetolus (Αιτωλός), a king of Elis
  • Agamemnon (Ἀγαμέμνων), a king of Mycenae and commander of the Greek armies during the Trojan War
  • Agasthenes, a king of Elis
  • Agenor (Αγήνωρ), a king of Phoenicia
  • Alcinous (Αλκίνους or Ἀλκίνοος), a king of Phaeacia
  • Alcmaeon, a king of Argos and one of the Epigoni
  • Aleus, a king of Tegea
  • Amphiaraus (Ἀμφιάραος), a seer and king of Argos. He participated in the Calydonian Boar hunt and the war of the Seven Against Thebes.
  • Amphictyon (Ἀμφικτύων), a king of Athens
  • Amphion and Zethus, twin sons of Zeus and kings of Thebes. They built the city's walls.
  • Amycus, son of Poseidon and king of the Bebryces
  • Anaxagoras (Ἀναξαγόρας), a king of Argos
  • Anchises (Αγχίσης), a king of Dardania and father of Aeneas
  • Arcesius, a king of Ithaca and father of Laertes
  • Argeus, a king of Argos
  • Argus, a son of Zeus and king of Argos after Phoroneus
  • Assaracus, a king of Dardania
  • Asterion, a king of Crete
  • Athamas (Ἀθάμας), a king of Orchomenus
  • Atreus (Ἀτρεύς), a king of Mycenae and father of Agamemnon and Menelaus
  • Augeas (Αυγείας), a king of Elis
  • Autesion, a king of Thebes
  • Bias, a king of Argos
  • Busiris, a king of Egypt
  • Cadmus, first king of Thebes
  • Car, a king of Megara
  • Catreus, a king of Crete. A prophecy said that his own son would kill him.
  • Cecrops, a native king of Athens
  • Ceisus, a king of Argos
  • Celeus, a king of Eleusis
  • Cephalus, a king of Phocis who accidentally killed his own wife
  • Cepheus, a king of Ethiopia
  • Cepheus, a king of Tegea who sailed with the Argonauts
  • Charnabon, a king of the Getae
  • Cinyras, a king of Cyprus and father of Adonis
  • Codrus, a king of Athens
  • Corinthus, first king of Corinth
  • Cranaus, a king of Athens
  • Creon, a king of Thebes, brother of Laius and uncle of Oedipus
  • Creon, a king of Corinth who was friendly towards Jason and Medea
  • Cres, an early king of Crete
  • Cresphontes, a king of Messene descended from Heracles
  • Cretheus, first king of Iolcus
  • Criasus, a king of Argos
  • Cylarabes, a king of Argos
  • Cynortas, a king of Sparta
  • Cyzicus, king of the Dolionians. He was mistakenly killed by the Argonauts.
  • Danaus, a king of Egypt and father of the Danaides
  • Dardanus, first king of Dardania, and son of Zeus and Electra
  • Deiphontes, a king of Argos
  • Demophon of Athens, a king of Athens
  • Diomedes, a king of Argos and hero of the Trojan War
  • Echemus, a king of Arcadia
  • Echetus, a king of Epirus
  • Eetion, a king of Cilician Thebe and father of Andromache
  • Electryon, a king of Tiryns and Mycenae. Son of Perseus and Andromeda.
  • Elephenor, a king of the Abantes of Euboea
  • Eleusis, king of Eleusis in Attica
  • Epaphus, a king of Egypt and founder of Memphis
  • Epopeus, a king of Sicyon
  • Erechtheus, a king of Athens
  • Erginus, a king of Minyean Orchomenus in Boeotia
  • Erichthonius, a king of Athens. He was born out of Hephaestus' attempt to rape Athena.
  • Eteocles, a king of Thebes and son of Oedipus. He and his brother Polynices killed each other.
  • Eteocles, a king of Orchomenus
  • Eurotas, a king of Sparta
  • Eurystheus, a king of Tiryns
  • Euxantius, a king of Ceos, son of Minos and Dexithea
  • Gelanor, a king of Argos
  • Haemus, a king of Thrace
  • Helenus, seer and twin brother of Cassandra. He later became king of Epirus.
  • Hippothoön, a king of Eleusis
  • Hyrieus, a king of Boeotia
  • Ilus, first king of Troy
  • Ixion, a king of the Lapiths. He tried to rape Hera and was imprisoned in Tartarus.
  • Laërtes, father of Odysseus and king of the Cephallenians. He sailed with the Argonauts and participated in the Calydonian Boar hunt.
  • Laomedon, a king of Troy and father of Priam
  • Lycaon of Arcadia, an Arcadian king who was transformed into a wolf by Zeus
  • Lycurgus of Arcadia, a king of Arcadia
  • Lycurgus of Nemea, a king of Nemea
  • Makedon, a king of Macedon
  • Megareus of Onchestus, a king of Onchestus in Boeotia
  • Megareus of Thebes, a king of Thebes
  • Melampus, a legendary soothsayer and healer, and king of Argos
  • Melanthus, a king of Messenia
  • Memnon, a king of Ethiopia who fought on the side of Troy during the Trojan War
  • Menelaus, a king of Sparta and the husband of Helen
  • Menestheus, a king of Athens who fought on the side of the Greeks during the Trojan War
  • Midas, a king of Phrygia. He was given the power to turn anything to gold just by touching it.
  • Minos, a king of Crete. After his death, he became one of the judges of the dead in the underworld.
  • Myles, a king of Laconia
  • Nestor, a king of Pylos who sailed with the Argonauts. He participated in the Calydonian Boar hunt and fought with the Greek armies in the Trojan War.
  • Nycteus, a king of Thebes
  • Odysseus, a hero and king of Ithaca whose travels are the subject of Homer's Odyssey. He also played a major role in the Trojan War.
  • Oebalus, a king of Sparta
  • Oedipus, a king of Thebes. He fulfilled a prophecy that said he would kill his father and marry his mother.
  • Oeneus, a king of Calydon
  • Oenomaus, a king of Pisa
  • Oenopion, a king of Chios
  • Ogygus, a king of Thebes
  • Oicles, a king of Argos
  • Oileus, a king of Locris
  • Orestes, a king of Argos and a son of Clytemnestra and Agamemnon. He killed his mother in revenge for her murder of his father.
  • Oxyntes, a king of Athens
  • Pandion I, a king of Athens
  • Pandion II, a king of Athens
  • Peleus, king of the Myrmidons and father of Achilles. He sailed with the Argonauts and participated in the Calydonian Boar hunt.
  • Pelias, a king of Iolcus. He took the throne from the rightful heir, Aeson.
  • Pelops, a king of Pisa and founder of the House of Atreus
  • Pentheus, a king of Thebes. He banned people from worshipping Dionysus, and was torn apart by Maenads.
  • Perseus (Περσεύς), first king of Mycenae. He killed Medusa.
  • Phineus, a king of Thrace
  • Phlegyas, a king of the Lapiths
  • Phoenix, first king of Phoenicia
  • Phoroneus, a king of Argos
  • Phyleus, a king of Elis
  • Pirithoös, king of the Lapiths and husband of Hippodamia. The Battle of Lapiths and Centaurs occurred at his wedding.
  • Pittheus, a king of Troezen and grandfather of Theseus
  • Polybus of Corinth, a king of Corinth
  • Polybus of Sicyon, a king of Sicyon and son of Hermes
  • Polybus of Thebes, a king of Thebes
  • Polynices, a king of Thebes and son of Oedipus. He and his brother Eteocles killed each other.
  • Priam, king of Troy during the Trojan War
  • Proetus, a king of Argos and Tiryns
  • Pylades, a king of Phocis and friend of Orestes
  • Rhadamanthys, a king of Crete. After his death, he became a judge of the dead in the underworld.
  • Rhesus, a king of Thrace who sided with Troy in the Trojan War
  • Sarpedon, a king of Lycia and son of Zeus. He fought on the side of the Greeks during the Trojan War.
  • Sisyphus, a king of Thessaly who tried to cheat death. He was sentenced to an eternity of rolling a heavy rock up a hill, only to watch it roll back down.
  • Sithon, a king of Thrace
  • Talaus, a king of Argos who sailed with the Argonauts
  • Tegyrios, a king of Thrace
  • Telamon, a king of Salamis and father of Ajax. He sailed with the Argonauts and participated in the Calydonian Boar hunt.
  • Telephus, a king of Mysia and son of Heracles
  • Temenus, a king of Argos and descendant of Heracles
  • Teucer, first king of Salamis. He fought on the side of the Greeks in the Trojan War.
  • Teutamides, a king of Larissa
  • Teuthras, a king of Mysia
  • Thersander, a king of Thebes. He was one of the Epigoni.
  • Theseus, a king of Athens. He killed the Minotaur.
  • Thyestes, a king of Mycenae and brother of Atreus
  • Tisamenus, a king of Argos, Mycenae and Sparta
  • Tyndareus, a king of Sparta

Seersꯁꯦꯝꯒꯠ ꯁꯥꯒꯠꯂꯨ

Seers were prophets, people who were said to be able to see the future or predict events before they happened.

  • Amphilochus (Αμφίλοχος), a seer and brother of Alcmaeon. He died in the war of the Seven Against Thebes.
  • Anius, son of Apollo who prophesied that the Trojan War would end in its tenth year
  • Branchus, a seer and son of Apollo
  • Calchas, an Argive seer who helped the Greeks during the Trojan War
  • Carnus, an Acarnanian seer and lover of Apollo
  • Carya, a seer and lover of Dionysus
  • Cassandra, a princess of Troy who was cursed. She could see the future but nobody would ever believe her.
  • Ennomus, a Mysian seer, killed by Achilles during the Trojan War
  • Halitherses, an Ithacan seer. He warned the men who wanted to marry Penelope that Odysseus would return.
  • Helenus, seer and twin brother of Cassandra, who later became king of Epirus
  • Iamus, a son of Apollo who was also a prophet. He founded the Iamidai.
  • Idmon, a seer who sailed with the Argonauts
  • Manto, seer and daughter of Tiresias
  • Melampus, a legendary soothsayer and healer, and king of Argos
  • Mopsus, the name of two legendary seers
  • Polyeidos, a Corinthian seer who saved the life of Glaucus
  • Telemus, a seer who foresaw that the Cyclops Polyphemus would be blinded by Odysseus
  • Theoclymenus, an Argive seer
  • Tiresias, blind prophet of Thebes

Amazonsꯁꯦꯝꯒꯠ ꯁꯥꯒꯠꯂꯨ

  • Aegea (Αιγέα), a queen of the Amazons
  • Aella (Ἄελλα), an Amazon who was killed by Heracles
  • Alcibie(Ἀλκιβίη), an Amazonian warrior, killed by Diomedes at Troy
  • Antandre (Ἀντάνδρη), an Amazonian warrior, killed by Achilles at Troy
  • Antiope (Ἀντιόπη), a daughter of Ares and sister of Hippolyta
  • Areto (Ἀρετώ), an Amazon
  • Asteria (Ἀστερία), an Amazon who was killed by Heracles
  • Bremusa (Βρέμουσα), an Amazonian warrior, killed by Idomeneus at Troy
  • Celaeno (Κελαινώ), an Amazonian warrior, killed by Heracles
  • Eurypyle (Εὐρυπύλη), an Amazon leader who invaded Ninus and Babylonia
  • Hippolyta (Ἱππολύτη), a daughter of Ares and queen of the Amazons
  • Hippothoe (Ἱπποθόη), an Amazonian warrior, killed by Achilles at Troy
  • Iphito (Ἰφιτώ), an Amazon who served under Hippolyta
  • Lampedo (Λαμπεδώ), an Amazon queen who ruled with her sister Marpesia
  • Marpesia (Μαρπεσία), an Amazon queen who ruled with her sister Lampedo
  • Melanippe (Μελανίππη), a daughter of Ares and sister of Hippolyta and Antiope
  • Molpadia (Μολπαδία), an Amazon who killed Antiope
  • Myrina (Μύρινα), a queen of the Amazons
  • Orithyia (Ὠρείθυια), an Amazon queen
  • Otrera (Ὀτρήρα), a queen of the Amazons, consort of Ares and mother of Hippolyta
  • Pantariste (Πανταρίστη), an Amazon who fought with Hippolyta against Heracles
  • Penthesilea (Πενθεσίλεια), a queen of the Amazons who fought in the Trojan War on the side of Troy

Inmates of Tartarusꯁꯦꯝꯒꯠ ꯁꯥꯒꯠꯂꯨ

  • The Danaides, forty-nine daughters of Danaus who murdered their husbands. They were punished for their crimes by being made to carry water in leaking jugs forever.
  • Ixion, a king of the Lapiths who tried to rape Hera. He was tied to a burning wheel in Tartarus as punishment.
  • Sisyphus, a king of Thessaly who tried to cheat death. He was sentenced to an eternity of rolling a big round rock up a hill, only to watch it roll back down.
  • Tantalus, a king of Anatolia who killed his son Pelops and served him as a meal to the gods. He was punished with the torture of starvation. Food and drink dangled forever just out of his reach.

ꯃꯁꯤꯁꯨ ꯌꯦꯡꯉꯨꯁꯦꯝꯒꯠ ꯁꯥꯒꯠꯂꯨ

ꯃꯇꯦꯡ ꯂꯧꯔꯛꯐꯝꯁꯦꯝꯒꯠ ꯁꯥꯒꯠꯂꯨ

  1. Chaos. Who's Who in Classical Mythology, Routledge (2002). Retrieved on 16 June 2011